KILLER SALES TRAINING ACTIVITIES THAT MOTIVATE AND INSPIRE

Hello and welcome to Chris Collins Inc. I’m Chris. “The Bulldog,” Collins, and I want to show you a few killer sales training activities that can really turn your business around. I use a technique called “gamification,” which applies the basic principles that make video games so compelling and motivating, to sales training, and even the daily operation of any business with a product or service to sell, and salespeople to sell it. These principles include goal setting, milestones with visual feedback to show progress toward and through the milestones and goals you set, increasing levels of difficulty, group interaction, and rewards for progress.

Without further ado, let’s take a look at a few simple gamified sales training activities that can motivate and inspire your sales team.

Product Knowledge Game Show

If you’re in a business in which your sales staff’s expertise about your products is a key revenue-driver, why not model a sales training game on a popular game show like Family Feud or Jeopardy? Jeopardy would be best for a sales force that’s highly competitive with each other, while Family Feud would be better for a more collaborative team.

These formats include built-in goals (winning by demonstrating product knowledge), milestones (the increasing amounts of the prize money), difficulty (as answers are eliminated or questions get harder), group interaction (through competition or teamwork), and of course, rewards.

REWARDS ARE CRITICAL

Speaking of rewards, let’s talk for a moment about that. For gamification of the sales process itself, cash is king, but that’s a little bit easier to do, because you can build the cost of the rewards into the price of the packages of products or services you’re rewarding them for selling. Still, cash prizes during training are an amazing motivational technique, if you’re willing and able to pony up the money. Alternatively, the winning team could get some sort of visual recognition of their victory, like an add-on to their name tags declaring them product knowledge experts. You could even take the winning team out to lunch afterward, while the other team just gets sandwiches ordered in.

Regardless of the specific prize you choose, it’s important that it is meaningful and motivational to your employees, to keep them engaged in the training. Before you know it, they’ll be learning, without even knowing it!

GAMIFICATION OF ROLEPLAYING

Of course, roleplaying already has some game elements to it, but it can be difficult to motivate employees, especially the less-outgoing ones, to participate in a roleplaying session. Yet, roleplaying can be critical, especially if your key driver in your business involves converting an introductory meeting to a close, or a phone call to a meeting. Unfortunately, it’s very hard to objectively score something like roleplaying or to install milestones into the experience. So, how do you gamify this basic training activity?

It’s simple! You can append another form of game onto the roleplaying exercise, as a more exciting way of rewarding participation. I might have a dart board, or a Wheel of Fortune style prize wheel set up at the front of the room. Participation would earn a token for one throw at the prize board or one spin of the wheel, and then the managers and sales trainers could walk around listening, and hand out additional tokens for outstanding performance. Again, cash prizes or other motivational rewards would be attached to the game afterward, adding some excitement and variation to the game.

WE’RE HERE TO HELP!

Here at Chris Collins Inc., we want you to know that you’re not in this alone. Putting together a well-crafted gamification system, whether just for training, or to integrate into your business’s daily operations, takes time, research, deep knowledge of your business and your sales team, and expertise. That’s why we’re here to help. Come on in and take a look around my website, and then let us know how we can help you set up sales training activities that will make a real difference in your company’s bottom line!

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