STRATEGIES THAT SELL

Here are several sales strategies I would like to share with you. Back in 1969, a technician is always ready to greet a customer coming in with a car problem. The technician would pull his car to a bay, look and discuss the trouble of the car. What fluids needing to be drained or replaced or the parts that needs repair. But now, additional crew was added to the mix, including the service managers and service advisors. The responsibility of a service advisor is to increase the sales, improve customer experience and enhance the technician’s productivity. If a technician will not be required to leave his work place in order to greet customers, he will be able to accomplish more work.

Majority of the service advisors in the field understands their role. But with the waning of profits in dealership, we are increasingly dependent on our service advisors to generate sales more than ever. Another thing that I learned while doing service clinics with our clients is that technicians are far better at doing sales than most of our advisors.

We just finished a mini cooper clinic during the weekend, and we make a sale of $32,000 worth of labor and customer paid parts in just one day. We expect to get that much work again within the next several months. While conducting car doctor service clinics, one thing becomes very obvious to everybody, it is very easy for a technician to make a sale. And the reason is that, the technician is basically the one who shows the customers what needs to be done with their car and nothing more. And the transaction usually goes something this way…

While a customer in the waiting room waits patiently, an automotive technician walks in and talks with the client. He will then bring them into the shop and will talk about a 32-point visual examination with the client standing near their car. They won’t be using any sales techniques, just show the client the car and pointing out the worn and torn areas like cracked belts and leaks in their car.
Usually a technician makes a bigger sale than any sales advisor, and that’s because of their much closer relationship with the customer. The technician is more likely to make an impression and develop trust between them.

Customers live in a totally different environment and most likely have never popped the hood or have never seen their cars’ underside. Their last visit with the technician and all the work done will be useless if a customer see a cracked belt or their vehicle leaking oil. They would want it to be repaired or replace and will need another trip, most probably to another dealer. Nothing can persuade the customer more for a comprehensive check up of their car than the technician working on it.

Service advisors learn many things from a technician selling more by just showing their clients what is best for their car. The technician was able to present two powerful things that go together, opportunity and sales. And that’s the service advisor’s job, creating sales and not talking their clients to save on service or products. Make customers eager of your services and keep technicians at their respective work place.

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